Conservation stories from one of the world’s most ecologically diverse regions.

#AdventureCalendar countdown! ’Tis the season for reflection so join us here on our month-long series as we look at some of our favorite outdoor adventures on public lands from 2020.

By: Zach Radmer, USFWS Fish and Wildlife Biologist, Washington Fish and Wildlife Office.

The author, Zach, stands outside on the trail with a butterfly net in one photo and holds a tiny orange butterfly

“Swoosh!” My net lay still, a colorful quarry perhaps captured after a brief sprint along the trail. Admittedly I’m more excited than you would think. It’s not every day that you catch something new. I don’t think people know that most butterflies get away. The large and sun-warmed individuals are highly motivated and will easily outpace you even into a headwind. I have carried a net for miles and caught nothing but mosquitos. But this time it’s a lustrous copper (Lycaena cupreus) that sports bright orange wings covered in dark black spots. …


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Photo: Did you know pollinators are responsible for more than 75% of what we eat? Coffee, chocolate, and pretty much all of the ingredients needed for pumpkin pie rely on pollinators so show them some love today!

When most people think about pollinators, they imagine graceful butterflies, or a busy and buzzy honey bee, pollinating crops and flowers to bring the pollen back to their hives and create honey. But pollinators include more than honey bees, as there are all different types of bees, bats, birds, and bugs that specialize in pollinating the plants native to their homes or ecosystems. In fact, some native plants and pollinators have a co-dependent relationship — meaning that one cannot exist without the other!

For example, birds like the i’iwi have long, curved beaks, perfect for drinking the nectar from flowers in places like Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge in Hawaii. …


People power the conservation work we do here in the Columbia Pacific Northwest Region. Today we are featuring the profile of Jarod Jebousek and the work he does to support the mission of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

By Jarod Jebousek and Dana Bivens

Biologists sitting in an open meadow
Biologists sitting in an open meadow
Partners Biologists, Jarod Jebousek (left) and Chris Seal (right) in a Fender’s blue butterfly meadow. PC: Paula Golightly/USFWS

The Willamette valley in Oregon is a unique region in a state with tremendous biological and geographical diversity. Running from Portland to Eugene, the valley stretches on either side of the Willamette River to the Oregon Coast Range to the west, and the Cascade Mountains in the east. …


People power the conservation work we do. We are #GratefulFor their service to America’s fish, wildlife, and habitat. Today we shine a spotlight on Kylee Butler, an awesome AmeriCorps intern serving through American Conservation Experience.

AmeriCorps member Kylee shows off a smile and a huge salmon
AmeriCorps member Kylee shows off a smile and a huge salmon
Photo: AmeriCorps member Kylee Butler shows off a big smile and an even bigger steelhead at Makah National Fish Hatchery, Credit: USFWS

baɫu·ɫšiƛ (Welcome)! My home is the Makah Indian Reservation of which I am a proud tribal member. I am serving as an Americorps intern stationed at the Makah National Fish Hatchery (MNFH) in Neah Bay, Washington. …


By Jarod Jebousek and Dana Bivens

People power the conservation work we do here in the Columbia Pacific Northwest Region. Today we are featuring the profile of Jarod Jebousek and the work he does to support the mission of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

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Willamette Valley Tulip Farm, Credit: Jim Choate

What is your job title?

I am a Partners for Fish and Wildlife Biologist for the US Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and I work out of the Willamette Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex (WVNWRC), in Benton County, Oregon. I work with landowners and other partners to achieve habitat conservation on non-federal lands for the benefit of rare and declining habitats and their associated wildlife. …


By: Julia Pinnix, visitor services manager, Leavenworth Fisheries Complex

Two young students express surprise and excitement as they get hands-on during Kids in the Creek Program
Two young students express surprise and excitement as they get hands-on during Kids in the Creek Program
Photo: Students get hands-on during the Kids in the Creek Program at Entiat National Fish Hatchery, Credit: Julia Pinnix/USFWS

October is the month for Kids in the Creek (KITC), a program that brings high school students to Entiat National Fish Hatchery for a day of hands-on field biology led by natural resource professionals. This year, in-person field trips were not an option, but KITC partners pulled together and made a virtual but interactive program succeed.

KITC is managed by Leavenworth Fisheries Complex and Cascadia Conservation District. Now in its 27th year, this program pulls in partners from throughout the region, from the City of Wenatchee to the US Forest Service. Chelan and Douglas county teachers rely on KITC to provide real-life science experience for their students. …


The COVID-19 pandemic is making all things different. With the school year starting online for most areas of the Pacific Northwest and beyond, things don’t look the same at our facilities. Spawning at the Columbia River Gorge National Fish Hatchery Complex hatcheries was very different — limited employees, no volunteers and no school group tours. It was quiet, it was smoky and it was different. But different doesn’t mean gone. The Columbia Gorge Information and Education Office, staffed by Cheri Anderson and Jennifer Rowlen, got to work with virtual tours and visits. …


Article by Terry Frederick/Fish and Wildlife Biologist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Columbia Pacific Northwest Region.

To help celebrate Arctic Refuge Virtual Bird Fest (#ArcticBirdFest), we here in the USFWS Columbia Pacific Northwest Region wanted to highlight one of our favorite arctic birds, that happens to have a regionally endemic subspecies right here in the USFWS Columbia Pacific Region. #HowDoYouArctic

Ptarmigan (pronounced Taar-muh-gn) are small grouse regally adapted to cold, snowy winter climates of the arctic and alpine. They turn all-white in the winter and blend in perfectly in fields of snow. Their white feathers are well-insulated and they are adapted to live in cold temperatures. They have feathered feet, which act like snowshoes. …


Article by Brent Lawrence / Public Affairs Officer for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Columbia Pacific Northwest Region.

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Rebecca Chuck had an extremely important mission in June 2019.

She was the Honor Flight guardian for retired Marine Sgt. First Class Edgar Fox during the 77th anniversary of Battle of Midway Commemoration on June 4, 2019, at the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge and Battle of Midway National Memorial.

As the representative from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Rebecca accompanied Sgt. …


By Brent Lawrence — Public Affairs Officer with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Pacific Region in Portland, Oregon.

Hunting and wildlife conservation. At first blush, the two might seem to be at odds.

How can you promote wildlife conservation by hunting for the same animals you’re working to save? Welcome to the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation, a model that is truly unique in the world.

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Ric (left) and Garric Shirrod from Washington with their pronghorn antelope at Hart Mountain National Wildlife Refuge.

From its inception in the late 1800s, hunters, anglers and recreational shooters have been the driving force behind this set of home-grown wildlife management principles, which set forth the radical idea that wildlife belongs to everyone, not just the rich and privileged. …

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